Six Theater Songs

DAH_1991_Guggenheim.jpg
DAH_1991_Guggenheim.jpg

Six Theater Songs

16.75

Includes songs from House to Half, Together, I Hear America Singing, and A Woman in Morocco.

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CONTENTS

  • House to Half, from the musical revue House to Half
  • I've Never Wanted Anyone Before, from the musical Together
  • (And Then) I Let Him Go
  • I Believe in Song
  • Remember How it Was? from the musical I Hear America Singing
  • Love Comes With a Knife, from the opera A Woman in Morocco

NOTES ON THE SONGS

House to Half was completed on November 5th, 1980 in Madison, Wisconsin. With lyrics by Ed Flesch, it served as the opening number of a revue of the same name produced by the UW-Madison Opera and directed by Karlos Moser. The show ran for five performances during January 1981.

I’ve Never Wanted Anyone Before is drawn from the musical Together, for which I contributed book, lyrics, and music in July and August 1976 in New Berlin, Wisconsin. I revised the song at Yaddo during September 1998, adding a B section and a bridge, after playing and singing the original (juvenilia) version on a dare for New York theatrical producer and arts advocate Harold Reed, who commissioned a revised version, which I introduced at a private salon at his home later that fall.

During winter 2013 and the early months of 2014 I wrote the score, lyrics and book on commission from the Skylight Music Theater in Milwaukee, Wisconsin for I Hear America Singing, which had a month-long commercial run during March 2014. Three songs are included from that musical, (And Then) I Let Him Go, based on the folk tune Liza Jane, Remember How it Was? (a duet in the show, revised to be a solo song for this collection), and I Believe in Song, which I revised slightly to serve as a concert number for an October 2015 90th birthday concert for Ned Rorem presented at the Curtis Institute of music in Philadelphia.

Follows a song from the 2015 opera A Woman in Morocco, a verismo two act noir relaying the story of a young American writer who comes to Morocco during the late 50s to write about human trafficking and falls prey to a pair of unscrupulous men whose illegal activities she is on the verge of discovering. Love Comes With a Knife reoccurs throughout the opera at key moments, emanating from an onstage shortwave radio and sung by a nightclub singer named Minerva Mudd. The lyric is adapted from a poem by the great 13th century Persian poet Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Rūmī.